Bearings

I’m still very much alive and kicking, although these days I’m sure my legs are much too tired to kick too high. In the past year I’ve moved back home, and gotten a full-time job – which has taken over about 90% of my conscious time. It’s predictably in the food industry although there are many days (days when people are challenging and frustrating), that I wonder if I’m on the wrong side of the restaurant.

That said, I enjoy my job despite its challenges and I think I’ve finally found myself in an industry that I feel 1000% comfortable in. Its opened my eyes to the opportunities and variety of manner with which I can choose to pursue this rather unideal passion of mine.

I have grown up in so many ways this past year, and yet I’m constantly discovering new things to learn. The hours are tough (I’m finishing up my 74-hour work week ie. that’s 74+ hours ON MY FEET for all you people whining about having to work Saturdays- boo-fucking-hoo, princess), the clientele is challenging but the laughs you share with your colleagues, the bonds you form through solidarity, and the pleasure you get when you stumble upon rare, gratuitous customers makes everything worth its while. It also makes you a much more humble, respectful and gracious customer btw!

I have not forgotten this blog, but every intention I have of updating it, paying someone to redo the layout, actually pouring devoted hours to giving it some proper structure has fallen to the wayside. I am so doggone tired on my days off that I either just want to mimic a lump of clay, or do the things I love, which still involves standing on my feet for hours whilst slaving in front of a hot stove.

I’ll be back. (Just don’t time me!)


Boo-yeah(!)-baisse

I am ashamed to admit that the last few times I’ve even logged onto WordPress was to remove spam comments. It’s also the most traffic action my blog has seen lately. I feel a rant coming on about these stupid comments and what I can do to make them disappear but I’ll save it for another day. Although, if you have any advice on how to handle this pest problem, feel free to share.

I wish I had a more solid excuse as to why I’ve been MIA but between two major festive seasons (Christmas and Chinese New Year), finishing up my studies, relocating back home and just taking a break from real life, I can’t say I’ve been up to much. I’ll admit I’m getting a little bit stir-crazy without much purpose in my life, which is probably why I’ve decided to tiptoe back on here and update. Thankfully for you (and me!), I have lots of backlogged pictures. I pretty much never stay out of the kitchen for too long anyway so that’s never going to be a problem.

Bouillabaisse

I think there was a time when I was watching way too much Top Chef and got really fixated on making a Bouillabaisse. Of course I’d never had it before in my life but what does one do in this instance? Use Epicurious!

I stumbled upon this recipe and with some augmentation, like the omission of the lobster, I pretty much got everything I wanted.

You will really appreciate having a fresh loaf of baguette to go with this amazing hearty soup. I may have gone a bit crazy with the butter that was spread on the baguette too. Sooo good. Surprisingly, it was very, very filling and we ended up with so much leftovers that we froze the rest up to be had later.

If you’re wondering what on earth that round lump thing in the soup is, it’s the rouille and this is the thing that elevates the soup to a whole new level. I beg of you, do not forgot this important component to the dish!

And if you can’t already tell from the pictures, I kind of overcooked the fish. By the time we reheated the soup to have again the next day, most of the fish had dissolved. Oops. I am horrble at cooking fish. Just as well I’m not too crazy about them.


French Onion Soup; Two Ways

French Onion Soup

A while back I had this minor obsession with French Onion Soup. I just needed to make it. The first time I did, I used Smitten Kitchen’s recipe, which was delicious.

That was the outcome. Mine turned out a whole lot darker for some strange reason.

Then Ruhlman wrote about it here and he doesn’t use stock, just water. I was keen to try that, too.

You have no idea how much I teared chopping those onions up.

Sweating it out

I think I actually prefer Ruhlman’s recipe. The cheese is meant to be a lot more brown but I got impatient (I was hungry!) so I popped it out of the oven pretty early.

I froze it so I actually still have a little small portion of it left in the freezer. I also currently have a loaf of baguette sitting on my counter. Coincidence? Nay, fate.


Sweet Sticky Sin

Ultimate Sticky Buns

The last time I made Cinnamon Buns, my friend Karen pointed out sticky buns to me. Apparently it was exactly like cinnamon buns, but on speed. Or a sugar high. I read about how it had a sticky caramel glaze with pecans and I pretty much salivated all over my keyboard. True story.

If you want, the recipe is right here. I didn’t bother hunting down dark corn syrup (I used glucose instead) and I reduced the sugar a fair bit because I really don’t like overly sweet things. Even then, I still found the buns really sweet.

I went a bit crazy with the pecans, as you can see. And that’s the sticky caramel glaze. It smelled AMAZING. I used a springform caketin for this and my only advice if you’re doing the same is to double foil the base of the tin and put it on a deeper tray because that glaze is going to find a way to seep out and if you hate cleaning your oven as much as I do, you’d heed my advice.

Fresh out of the oven and it smelled divine. I was dying to pick away at it.

Flipped over with all the glazed goodness oozing everywhere. It was seriously one of those silent foodgasm moments when I had a fresh out of the oven piece. Yes it was really sweet but oh goodness was it ever sticky and the pecans added the crunch I so loved. And the scent of cinnamon that lingered in my apartment for the next 24 hours? Major perk.


Pistou Pizzazz

Salmon with Pepper and Beans and Almond Pistou

In a recent effort to eat healthier and cleaner, I made this for dinner. I resorted to my favourite recipe search engine, Epicurious, and found this recipe.

As usual, I made a few augmentations due to what I lacked in the pantry. I omitted the dill and sugar snap peas and went for chives and green beans instead. I can’t recommend this dish enough. It was so delicious and so healthy!

The pistou was what did it for me. It was crazy how fresh and addictive it was. I ended up using the leftovers for wraps that I would make for lunch or even just snacking on it by the spoonful. I know, it’s bizarre but gosh darn it, it was good.

Actually, I have a feeling I’ll be making the pistou again. It just goes with everything and it’s so flexible that I could just mix and match the ingredients as I pleased. I could use pine nuts or pecans, I could swap the herbs for thyme or parsley, I could put shallots and garlic in there as well. The possibilities are endless!

(Yes, I’ll be posting more now! I have so many backlogged entries!)


Going Green

It’s something I’ve been obsessing over for a while but I finally bit the bullet and got started when my lovely friends, Tessa and Jason, drove me out to Bunnings so I could get everything I needed to get started.

So may I present my cute little balcony herb garden!

We’ve got mint, rosemary, sage, thyme, lemon thyme, oregano, basil, parsley, coriander.. and a French radish plant.

My baby basil! It’s not doing so well due to the cold weather we’ve been having the past few days, though :(

The chilli plant and some vegetable seedlings. The seedlings are the most fun to care for as their growth is so noticeable!

Here they are a little over a week later. How cute are they?! They make me so proud!


Americana

My closest friends know that I have an obsessive personality. I’ve gone through the Top Chef obsession, the Twilight faildom, and most recently I’ve been pretty caught up with Game of Thrones (does anyone else watch this? It’s SO good!) and Southern food. This is probably because I have two really close friends in America and we love talking food, especially when I’m chatting with Jasmine. With the aforementioned Top Chef obsession, I was always curious about this biscuits, gravy, chicken fried steak, collard greens, BBQ, “soul food”, etc phenomenon that had professionally trained chefs drooling and sometimes really cranky. So after a night of too much discussion on Southern food and too much time browsing Epicurious for recipes, I decided I just have to make myself a southern meal one day.

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Southern fried chicken, biscuits & gravy

That day was yesterday.

I should say that the first thing one should know when thinking about Southern food is all notions of dieting, healthy eating, a trim waistline and especially a fear of pork/lard have to be thrown right out the window and absolutely forgotten. Dismissed and never to be brought up while you’re chowing down on glorious, sinful food.

I even whipped out my deep frier for the first time in years! It ended up using a lot of oil but it was worth it because I love that I didn’t have to deal with painful oil splatters, a greasy kitchen floor or uneven cooking. Deep friers are such handy appliances. Look at that gorgeous golden colour!

A meal of such epic proportions required guests so I asked Tessa and Jason over for dinner. Tessa asked if I needed anything, but as I was strictly sticking to an Americana themed menu, I told her she could supply the drinks. So she brought us sangria! Mmmm. Tessa is the queen of sangria. This was such a good jug of potent deliciousness. We still have some leftover which I’m sure my housemate and I will dispose of safely.

If you’re wondering what exactly this is, I’ll be kind and redirect you right to the recipe. It’s called Chicken Biscuits. Now, I have absolutely no clue what this was meant to taste like, especially the biscuits. I’ve asked numerous friends and I think they all told me it resembled scones but more buttery. I’ve had some dreadful scones in my lifetime so I wasn’t really excited about the idea of scones with my fried chicken. But then I made this biscuits and the moment they were fresh out of the oven, I tore into one and widened my eyes in surprised pleasure. It was flaky on the outside but the inside was pleasantly fluffy. And yes, there was a certain sort of buttery flavour to it that added to its magic. Before dinner rolled around, Jacey and I had managed a biscuit each. Plain!

Let’s talk about this gravy for a while. When I heard gravy, I was thinking of your typical deglazed pan. Then I saw this recipe (which you should click HERE for), I knew it would be spectacular. First of all, SAUSAGE. Looove sausage. And bacon drippings? Hello, sold!

I’m going to go a little off-track and ramble on about some TV show I was watching the other night about raising pigs and slaughtering them and the contents of a supermarket sausage vs a butcher’s sausage and why the price difference is there. I bought sausages from the deli in the market today but I had underestimated my portion by about 100g so I had to run to the supermarket and get some pork sausages. When I tore off the casings of both sausages, I was appalled to see the difference in colour. I wish I had taken a picture now. The sausage from the market was a gorgeous red with not much fat in it and you could see herbs in the mix but the supermarket sausage was pale, a light pink, almost like the colour of chicken. There was SO much fat in there as well and the texture of it was so disgusting; soft and sticky. The butcher’s sausage was firm and didn’t just all out of the casing like guts from a cheap horror film.

Now, although the idea of bacon drippings set my heart aflutter with keen anticipation, I decided it was just ridiculous to buy bacon to render the fat and discard it. I also have a handy tub of duck fat just sitting in my refrigerator for when I want to make roast potatoes (mm!) so I thought, “Hey, I could up the ante on the fat. I’ll make it with duck fat!” and so I did. And it was glorious. Oh the smell of duck fat as it permeates through the air is heavenly. Plus, I loved that it wasn’t a dark, unforgiving taint the way bacon drippings tend to be. I played fast and loose with the recipe too, I think I doubled the flour and the milk. I just went with the texture and taste (and volume!) that felt right.

Before you think me a terribly unhealthful hostess who didn’t provide any sort of colour for her dinner guests, I actually made a really delicious salad. Unfortunately for me and you, salads don’t tend to photograph too well, especially not this one. Also especially when I don’t have a salad bowl and in my haste, I ended up using a metal mixing bowl. All class.

The salad was something I took off the September issue of Delicious. It’s a watercress, fennel avocado, tarragon salad with goat’s cheese and a lemon vinaigrette. I pretty much doubled the salad recipe for four of us but we actually wiped the salad bowl clean. Despite the fact that we were pretty much struggling to finish our dinners!

New York Cheesecake

For dessert I figured it was absolutely necessary to end with a great American dessert: the New York Cheesecake. It was mainly for selfish reasons because I’ve been craving cheesecake for a long time. I hate to admit this on here because I will sound like the biggest snob you’ve ever met, but I hate buying cakes in Melbourne because I don’t think Melburnians know what good cake is. The places I often get recommended to serve dry, too sweet, too ordinary, subpar cakes. They look pretty but they taste like flavoured sawdust. However, when I have a craving for a cake, it’s really annoying to think that I can’t fulfill that craving by just walking out the door and handing money over to a proprietor and getting what I want. I’m always met with disappointment and then I’m fueled with the need to fix my problem by making the dessert I want, and splendidly too.
(Ps. I’ve had some really good cake in Melbourne too, though. Always seems to be of the chocolate variety, though. Burch & Purchese and Le Petit Gateau have made me a happy camper so far)

Long story short: I wanted cheesecake. I had to make it.

I found the recipe in my new favourite cookbook, The Essential New York Times Cookbook. All the accolades and praise that has been bestowed upon this book has not done this book enough justice. I don’t know how much more I can praise this book and promote it to friends and family short of buying everyone a copy for their birthdays. If you’re one of those people who hates cookbooks without pictures ( I am sometimes this person too actually), this may be a tough one to follow through with. But then I sat down and just read through the book and I marveled at the well thought out layout, the recipes and the brilliant serving suggestions (they hook you up with other recipes in the book that will go with the dish! Dinner party menu solved!) and I got over my need to see pretty glossy pictures beside every recipe. I have an overactive sense of imagination anyway, it was starting to get blunt in my old age.

Anyway, the cheesecake recipe is called Junior’s Cheesecake and it is wonderful. I messed up because by some fluke, my conversion of ounces to gram came up 100g short and I was too lazy to jump out of the apartment for a brick of cream cheese… I actually made the cake with less cream cheese than was called for. Hey America, how about getting on board with the metric system, huh? I was nervous about it because I was afraid it would be too watery, or it wouldn’t taste creamy enough but thankfully, it was fantastic!

My one gripe is the loose biscuit base without flavour. If you’ve noticed in the picture, there are biscuit crumbs everywhere. The recipe called for crushed graham crackers, patted into a buttered pan base. I was hesitant but thought hey, might be worth giving it a shot and now that I’ve done it, my advice is never ever do this to a beautiful cheesecake. When I make this cheesecake again (and trust me, I will), I’ll be doing the crust the delicious way with melted butter, sugar and a pinch of salt then patted down and either baked or frozen to set. Other than that, the cheesecake was wonderful. It was fluffy and light and just creamy enough.

If you can’t take my word for it, I’ll just quietly tell you that after spooning the batter into the pan and popping the cake into the oven, I brought the mixing bowl over to Jacey to let her have a little bit of batter left in the bowl. She loved it so much that I had to leave my bowl and spatula with her as she polished it clean! She also had a slice of cheesecake all to herself for dessert. And may I quote her praise, “This may be the best cheesecake I’ve ever had.”

Next up from the Southern food recipes I browsed: Fried Oyster Po’ Boys! Mmm!


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